Question: Hey I have a question for you, not judging just asking: how do you support lgbtq so strongly as a muslim? 
the simplest answer is that I’m a queer Muslim woman. and my passion  for certain issues that come out of the LGBTQ community are by extension supporting myself. and if through manifesting my passion and affirming myself i can connect and struggle with other people then that’s great. 
Even if I wasn’t a queer Muslim, I have the agency and free will as a Muslim to read and interpret my faith in a way which affirms my support of a cause. I have the ability to excavate the threads of social justice that already exist within the Qu’ran, perform textual exegesis (meaning understanding how a text treats a certain issue over time and how it evolves as the text progresses) and through the examples given by understanding the life of the Prophet Mohammad (PBUH) in relation to the issues I’m most passionate about. 
I essentially don’t believe a righteous believer is a passive, sleeping believer. I don’t let others interpret my faith for me, make decisions for me, or tell me what to believe. Because how can you ever become comfortable with your faith and your creator if your understanding is predicated on everyone else’s thoughts but your own? There’s a huge difference between using outside sources and opinions to inform how you feel and swallowing other peoples thoughts whole without a second thought. I take the basic tenants of my faith, the texts provided to me, and I read them for myself. 
And i think if more people did that for themselves: learned how to think critically about their faith (regardless of what it is), fostered spiritual environments where critical thought, introspection, and interpretation were the norms and not the exception, they wouldn’t think being a person of faith who is supportive of causes coded as “progressive” is so shocking, unheard of, or such an oxymoron. 

Question: Hey I have a question for you, not judging just asking: how do you support lgbtq so strongly as a muslim? 

the simplest answer is that I’m a queer Muslim woman. and my passion  for certain issues that come out of the LGBTQ community are by extension supporting myself. and if through manifesting my passion and affirming myself i can connect and struggle with other people then that’s great. 

Even if I wasn’t a queer Muslim, I have the agency and free will as a Muslim to read and interpret my faith in a way which affirms my support of a cause. I have the ability to excavate the threads of social justice that already exist within the Qu’ran, perform textual exegesis (meaning understanding how a text treats a certain issue over time and how it evolves as the text progresses) and through the examples given by understanding the life of the Prophet Mohammad (PBUH) in relation to the issues I’m most passionate about. 

I essentially don’t believe a righteous believer is a passive, sleeping believer. I don’t let others interpret my faith for me, make decisions for me, or tell me what to believe. Because how can you ever become comfortable with your faith and your creator if your understanding is predicated on everyone else’s thoughts but your own? There’s a huge difference between using outside sources and opinions to inform how you feel and swallowing other peoples thoughts whole without a second thought. I take the basic tenants of my faith, the texts provided to me, and I read them for myself. 

And i think if more people did that for themselves: learned how to think critically about their faith (regardless of what it is), fostered spiritual environments where critical thought, introspection, and interpretation were the norms and not the exception, they wouldn’t think being a person of faith who is supportive of causes coded as “progressive” is so shocking, unheard of, or such an oxymoron.