colored queer waters

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897

lareinaana:

Go to sleep: tired
REM sleep: tired
Wake up: tired
Pass out: still tired

I woke up like this
I woke up like this

Fatigued

Reblogged 2 days ago from dadgenes
837
"I wish I was a lesbian. Dating women must be so convenient. No drama, no heartaches. Lesbians have it easy."

Straight women proverb (via dykebunny)

Reblogged 2 days ago from abluesforbrklyn
7031

sourcedumal:

"I have gotten so many letters from girls and boys who were so excited and proud to see a Black woman performing one of their favorite characters, “Elphaba”, in the musical Wicked. I was in Wicked for nearly 2 and a half years and I learned so much during that time.. .it wasn’t always easy and I was so busy in my own experience of working at the Gershwin theatre that I didn’t truly imagine so many kids would be inspired.

"Oh, but the letters flew in, the artwork the fan sites, all the love that said "We’re so proud of you!" and "We can do it too!" I found out over the years that these things have meant alot to young people of color. "

- Actress Saycon Sengbloh, on being the first black ”Elphaba” in Wicked on Broadway.

YES

(Source: racebending)

Reblogged 2 days ago from vivanlosancestros

Eldercare: The Forgotten Feminist Issue.

41

moyazb:

So important!

Reblogged 2 days ago from moyazb

On being Palestinian in a pro-Israel institution

12
Reblogged 2 days ago from bilmishmish

Lady justice: Clarice Gaylord led the EPA's fight for communities of color

13

In 1992, Clarice Gaylord was working in the human resources office at the Environmental Protection Agency when she got the call to head the agency’s newly minted Office of Environmental Equity — later named the Office of Environmental Justice. The office, created by President George H. W. Bush’s EPA chief, Bill Reilly, was the federal government’s first serious attempt at addressing the problem of pollution falling most harshly on communities of color and low income.

Gaylord, who holds a PhD in zoology, had worked throughout the 1980s as a health science administrator at the National Cancer Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and then as director of the EPA’s research grants program before she wound up in the agency’s human resources office. The HR post was somewhat of a demotion, she said, that happened due to racism. But it proved fortuitous for her: When she became director of the environmental justice office, she used those personnel skills to expand the diversity of EPA’s staff, even as she helped develop mechanisms for how the EPA could better protect communities of color.

Reblogged 2 days ago from greenchestnuts
2

Surprisingly empty considering how close to the marathon it is. I thought it would be crawling with cops and drunk students. But it’s eerily quiet and kind of pleasant as I sat there waiting for my friend to give me my book back

This massive chemical plant is poised to wipe another Louisiana town off the map

45
Reblogged 2 days ago from maryhenrygeo

197

You know its Boston Marathon Day when: a fellow Muslim friend texts you safety alerts about where they are checking bags and to be on the lookout for white folks who might attack you because you are wearing a headscarf

 

There is No "We": V-Day, Indigenous Women and the Myth of Shared Gender Oppression , by Lauren Chief Elk | Model View Culture

38

(Source: chiefelk)

Reblogged 3 days ago from chrysalisamidst
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