sinidentidades:

Deputy police chief, officer in Florida town were members of the KKK

Police morale in Fruitland Park, Florida has been shaken after a deputy chief and officer resigned when the Federal Bureau of Investigations identified them as members of the Ku Klux Klan.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement presented Chief Terry Isaacs with copies of a confidential FBI report that identified Deputy Chief David Borst and Officer George Hunnewell as members of the KKK.

Earlier this year, a Florida Klan leader boasted to WFTV 9 that the organization has “police officers, paramedics, judges…everywhere.”

However, Chief Isaacs would only tell reporters for the Orlando Sentinel that the pair belonged to a “subversive organization” because he did not believe he was authorized to release the results of the report.

“It’s a tough situation. He was my assistant,” he said, adding that he never witnessed any behavior that would lead him to believe former Deputy Chief Borst was in the KKK. “But I’ve read the report, and it’s convincing.”

Chief Deputy State Attorney Ric Ridgway — from whom Isaacs sought counsel concerning the FBI’s report — told the Orlando Sentinel that “it’s not a crime to be a member of the KKK, even if you are the deputy chief. It’s not a crime to be stupid. It’s not a crime to hate people. It may be despicable, it may be immoral, but it’s not a crime.”

"The loss of two officers is significant for a town that only employs 13 full-time cops. They’re a good group of people,” Isaacs said. “The last thing I was expecting to hear in the year 2014 was for a professional law-enforcement officer to be a member of a subversive organization.”

In 2009, however, another Fruitland Park officer, James Elkins, resigned after pictures emerged online of him wearing a Klan hood and robe. Elkins initially claimed that he was not involved with the organization, but eventually admitted that he was the “district Kleage,” or local recruiter, for the National Aryan Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

UPDATE: Some criminal cases dropped in KKK officer controversy

thecheshirekitteh:

bleaksadrave:

sikssaapo-p:

lastrealindians:

HELP A NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILY THAT IS BEING SUED BY THEIR CHILD’S SCHOOL FOR QUESTIONING CULTURALLY OFFENSIVE THANKSGIVING CURRICULUM
The Eagle Bull- Oxendine family is being sued by their child’s school for defamation, because they asked the school to permanently change their offensive and culturally insensitive Thanksgiving curriculum and to honor a two-year scholarship taken from their daughter after they voiced their concern over Native appropriation there. The school was having children make feathered headbands and literally play Indian. When the Native parents expressed disapproval over it, rather than address this racially sensitive issue, the school told them to keep their children home from class.
This case is moving forward and they need to raise funds to defray mounting legal expenses. Please share this link and donate what you can. If they lose, we all lose. This case has the potential to set dangerous precedent where Natives are effectively gagged from speaking out against redface, appropriation and the abuse of our culture and sacred ways by mainstream society. This is legal conquest. We can’t allow them to play Indian and hide behind judicial robes to do it. Thank you.
Contribute here: http://www.gofundme.com/8f3z30
Zoom Info
thecheshirekitteh:

bleaksadrave:

sikssaapo-p:

lastrealindians:

HELP A NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILY THAT IS BEING SUED BY THEIR CHILD’S SCHOOL FOR QUESTIONING CULTURALLY OFFENSIVE THANKSGIVING CURRICULUM
The Eagle Bull- Oxendine family is being sued by their child’s school for defamation, because they asked the school to permanently change their offensive and culturally insensitive Thanksgiving curriculum and to honor a two-year scholarship taken from their daughter after they voiced their concern over Native appropriation there. The school was having children make feathered headbands and literally play Indian. When the Native parents expressed disapproval over it, rather than address this racially sensitive issue, the school told them to keep their children home from class.
This case is moving forward and they need to raise funds to defray mounting legal expenses. Please share this link and donate what you can. If they lose, we all lose. This case has the potential to set dangerous precedent where Natives are effectively gagged from speaking out against redface, appropriation and the abuse of our culture and sacred ways by mainstream society. This is legal conquest. We can’t allow them to play Indian and hide behind judicial robes to do it. Thank you.
Contribute here: http://www.gofundme.com/8f3z30
Zoom Info

thecheshirekitteh:

bleaksadrave:

sikssaapo-p:

lastrealindians:

HELP A NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILY THAT IS BEING SUED BY THEIR CHILD’S SCHOOL FOR QUESTIONING CULTURALLY OFFENSIVE THANKSGIVING CURRICULUM

The Eagle Bull- Oxendine family is being sued by their child’s school for defamation, because they asked the school to permanently change their offensive and culturally insensitive Thanksgiving curriculum and to honor a two-year scholarship taken from their daughter after they voiced their concern over Native appropriation there. The school was having children make feathered headbands and literally play Indian. When the Native parents expressed disapproval over it, rather than address this racially sensitive issue, the school told them to keep their children home from class.

This case is moving forward and they need to raise funds to defray mounting legal expenses. Please share this link and donate what you can. If they lose, we all lose. This case has the potential to set dangerous precedent where Natives are effectively gagged from speaking out against redface, appropriation and the abuse of our culture and sacred ways by mainstream society. This is legal conquest. We can’t allow them to play Indian and hide behind judicial robes to do it. Thank you.

Contribute here: http://www.gofundme.com/8f3z30

U.S. senators say federal action may be needed to curb 're-homing' of adpopted immigrant children

sinidentidades:

[TW: ABUSE, CSA]

U.S. lawmakers said on Tuesday that the federal government may have to take a stronger role to stop parents from transferring custody of their adopted children to strangers they meet on the Internet.

At a subcommittee hearing in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers took their first look at the practice known as “private re-homing,” which bypasses the government’s child welfare system to leave boys and girls in the custody of strangers, often with little more than a notarized power of attorney.

The hearing came in response to a Reuters investigation that found online forums where desperate parents solicited new families for children they no longer wanted. Testimony shed light on the potential need for federal action to strengthen protections for children and support state efforts to help parents with post-adoption challenges.

"(It) certainly makes sense to the extent that re-homing is happening over the Internet, that it’s crossing state borders, that that necessitates – even requires – a federal response," said Sen. Christopher Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat.

Joo Yeun Chang, the Obama administration official’s top official for foster care and adoption assistance programs, said the federal government needs to provide guidance for states on what she described as a new issue. But she called for an approach that would protect all children rather than risk singling out adoptive families.     

"There’s a lot of confusion about what legal custody of power of attorney documents even mean, what kind of responsibility that confers and what responsibilities parents have to maintain," she said during testimony.

"State laws need to be clear about what the parent’s responsibility is even if they do transfer legal custody."

No state or federal laws specifically prohibit re-homing. State laws that restrict the advertising and custody transfers of children rarely prescribe criminal sanctions and are frequently ignored.

After the news agency published its findings in September, at least four states passed new restrictions on advertising children, transferring custody, or both. Lawmakers in those states noted that the absence of government safeguards can result in children ending up in the hands of abusers.

Some child advocates say that congressional action is needed to limit re-homing by placing uniform restrictions on the advertising of children and requiring all custody transfers to non-relatives to be approved by a court.

But others say the need to seek court approval could be prohibitive for many families, in cases where custody of children is taken on by grandmothers or trusted family friends.  

In a report issued last year, the Congressional Research Service said the interstate aspect of re-homing and the role of the Internet in facilitating the practice gave Congress opportunities to act. “Although there appears to be no federal criminal law implicated by the general process of ‘re-homing,’ this does not preclude Congress from enacting laws to protect children that may be harmed by this practice,” the report said. The Government Accountability Office will begin studying state and federal policies related to re-homing this summer.

No government agencies track re-homing, but Reuters identified eight Internet groups in which members discussed, facilitated or engaged in the practice. In a single Yahoo group, a child was offered to strangers on average once a week during a five-year period. At least 70 percent of those children were listed as having been adopted from overseas; many were described as suffering emotional or behavioral problems. Yahoo has taken down the group.

Some re-homed children endured severe abuse, and the adults who used the online network to obtain children were not properly vetted, Reuters found. In one case, a man now serving prison time for child pornography took home a 10-year-old boy whom he and a friend found online hours earlier. They picked up the boy in a hotel parking lot.

At the request of U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., officials from the federal departments of State, Justice, Health and Human Services and Homeland security have been discussing ways to address re-homing. In May, Health and Human Services officials warned states about the dangers of the practice and encouraged them to use existing federal funding to support struggling adoptive families.   

labrujamorgan:

publishbiyuti:


Make Love to Rage the devastatingly femme book of poetry by Morgan Robyn Collado is finally available for download and purchase.
From the back of the book:

This collection of poetry is a cleansing and transformative journey that takes us from rage to love with a depth of emotion and beauty in words that is breathtaking. The first part, ‘Rage,’ communicates the rage and anger caused by injustice, in immediate and visceral ways. The transition into ‘Making’ has all the mess and beauty inherent in the seasons of autumn and spring. After the rage, after the making, we have ‘Love.’ And the sweetness, caring, and compassion of these poems is a soothing balm after the rage. Yet, it also underscores that deep love, more than anything, fuels rage over injustice.

You won’t regret buying this book of poetry!


oh my goodness! My book is finally available for purchase online! So do the thing!

labrujamorgan:

publishbiyuti:

Make Love to Rage the devastatingly femme book of poetry by Morgan Robyn Collado is finally available for download and purchase.

From the back of the book:

This collection of poetry is a cleansing and transformative journey that takes us from rage to love with a depth of emotion and beauty in words that is breathtaking. The first part, ‘Rage,’ communicates the rage and anger caused by injustice, in immediate and visceral ways. The transition into ‘Making’ has all the mess and beauty inherent in the seasons of autumn and spring. After the rage, after the making, we have ‘Love.’ And the sweetness, caring, and compassion of these poems is a soothing balm after the rage. Yet, it also underscores that deep love, more than anything, fuels rage over injustice.

You won’t regret buying this book of poetry!

oh my goodness! My book is finally available for purchase online! So do the thing!

The Coalition Zine

thecoalitionmag:

The Coalition Zine is a digital collective dedicated to putting girls of colour on the map by showcasing female writers, artists, and creators of colour on a monthly basis. The zine was created as a space dedicated solely to girls of colour, a  space where we can share our traumas, opinions, and triumphs with each other and grow together collectively. 

Recently, we got the opportunity to reach a wider audience by having the zine sold at Afropunk Fest ‘14. The only problem is our zine is digitally-based and we need to have printed copies for the zine tent at Afropunk fest. Printing enough copies will cost roughly $250. With this money, we will print enough copies to sell at Afropunk and also at local book stores, etsy, etc.

Having our zine at Afropunk Fest will show other girls of colour that don’t know about us that there’s a space dedicated to them, by people who are just like them. It will inspire girls of colour to create, write, invade creative spaces that people say we can’t be a part of because of where we come from and our skin colour. Help us reach other girls and show them that we are worth it and worthwhile. We have a very short time to raise this amount so please any donation, any amount will be greatly appreciated!

Outburst! Young Muslim Women's Project Ramadan Campaign

so outburst is an amazing organization that provides free programming for young muslim women in Toronto. i love talking with one of the organizers Farrah on twitter, and the hashtag convos they facilitate always do a good job of being inclusive. 

Please consider donating or signal boosting 

One of troubling things about Eric Garner’s death is that without the video, there would have been little recourse. The witnesses would have been deemed unreliable. Eric Garner, a monolith of a man, would have been considered a credible threat. I watched that video in horror, wanting to find a way to save Eric Garner and disgusted with myself by watching his last moments. It was not lost on me and many others that the spectacle of Eric Garner’s death mirrored Radio Raheem’s death in “Do the Right Thing”. Twenty-five years later, we have a black president, but even being a world famous professor like Skip Gates won’t keep a black man from getting arrested for “breaking” into his own house.

Garner couldn’t save himself even as he became compliant. Eric Garner called for help, crying out “I can’t breath” on six different occasions, and just as my brother or husband had to, would be forced in to utter compliance with no ability to be heard by those officers in charge. We might recall Oscar Grant who was also clearly subdued, leading to officer Johannes Mehserle shooting him. My cousin who witnessed the 1986 standoff said that my uncle put the gun down, yet the officers began, and continued, shooting. I could list other cases, but in the age before smart phones the law was usually on the side of the police officers. But then again, even video could not implicate police officers, as I learned during the Rodney King verdict in 1992.

But in this case there was a video. And it went viral. And I watched as did the rest of the nation. And then, I read about Muslims across the nation horrified by Garner’s death. But as a black Muslim who has been in the community for 21 years, I have come to realize that aside from posts condemning the act, few efforts are made from within our greater Muslim community. It leaves one to wonder how aware are American Muslims in general of these ongoing problems, profiling, within our own nation and faced by members of their very community simply on the basis of being black?

The NYPD spying of Muslims, which alarmed all Muslims around the country and brought upon exceptionally mobilizing organizations, was not in isolation, but reflected already existing intrusive policies that included stop and frisk of black and Latino men. As a black American Muslim, the reality of police brutality hit close to home. Last month, a brutal beating of a woman in front of her toddler went viral. I received a status update warning black Muslim women in New Jersey to be careful because the police were pulling over all black Muslim women regardless of resemblance to the suspect. In Philadelphia, where male criminals donned niqab to conceal their identity, black Muslim women have reported increased harassment. And in the mental health space, studies by Muslim mental health practitioners focus on post September 11th trauma faced by American Muslims when being profiled, yet few speak of the daily socio-economic conditions and profiling that cause so many inner city and working class blacks and black Muslim youth to suffer.

The Muslim American community cannot sit comfortably in isolation. In fact, our failure to address the realities of black American Muslims is becoming more evident as neighborhoods around inner city mosques crumble and some communities have lost their youth to the streets. Many grassroots programs lack support from mainstream Muslim organizations. There are a number of well-intentioned activist Muslims of immigrant descent who are on the forefront of protesting police brutality and addressing the prison industrial complex, but many of these activists are well versed in secular activism and often by-pass initiatives led by black American Muslims, which only further marginalizes black Muslim voices. It is time that Muslim social and civil society institutions build bridges and empower the disadvantaged and protest in the same ways that they do for oppressed Muslims abroad or of the government spying of Muslims at home. For many of us black Muslims, addressing police brutality, gun violence, education and health care access is not an intellectual exercise or some activist phase of our youth. It is our very survival. I ask you to care because Renisha is me, Oscar is me, Trayvon is me, Eric Garner is me. And there are millions of us facing this type of discrimination and profiling on a day to day, hour to hour, basis.

Muslims were so enraged by Eric Garner’s video – is that enough? by Margari Aziza Hill 

So i was sitting in my living room watching the trailer for Dear White People with my friend. And she asked me whether i was excited about it or not?

And I legit said to her “I’m afraid its going to be like Obama.”

She looks at me blankly like “what does that mean?” 

and i’m like “because at first you were excited to have a black president right? you never thought you would see some shit like that in your lifetime. and then it happened. and white people fucked it up. granted he fucked it up too with many of his policies but before some of that shit could even hit the fan white folks ruined it.  either by fetishizing him to the point where you want to throw up or being so racist you’re just sitting there like ‘omg i need this to be over tomorrow!’ but either way it got fucked up in both directions and now you can’t enjoy it anymore. and i don’t want Dear White People to be like that. I want to sit in the theater and enjoy that shit. I just wanna laugh. I don’t want to see articles where white liberals and those who proclaim themselves to be anti-racist nitpick it to death to the point where i’m just like ‘damn son can i live?!’ And conversely i don’t want the creators of Dear White People to say something that makes me disappointed in them. Like apologizing because too many white people got offended or doing an Afro-Punk where it magically gets post-racial just to deflect criticism.  Cause that shit always happens! You get excited for indie black productions, creations, whatever, that seem great on the surface until the creators open their mouths and then you’re like “damn gina!” So yeah my feelings are complex”

And she goes, “that’s real”

but on some real shit though I’m excited but at the same time I’m bracing myself